Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are the number one cause of unintentional death among children ages 1 to 19 according to CDC. It’s our goal, with our adjustable seat technology, to help reduce vehicle related child injuries and deaths. Take a look at the most recent data released on motor vehicle safety.

  • Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are the number one cause of unintentional death among children ages 1 to 195.*
  • 2,912 children ages 19 and under died in MVCs in 2014 as occupants or drivers. The number and rate of deaths was 2 percent higher in 2014 than the previous year. Since 2000, however, there has been a 40 percent decrease in the annual number of fatalities and a 56 percent decrease in the death rate.**
  • Teenagers ages 15-19 years made up 73 percent (2,138) of motor vehicle occupant/driverfatalities among children in 2014. The teen fatality rate was ten times higher than the rates for younger children (10.2 per 100,000 population for teenagers versus 1.2 to 1.3 for children under 15 years). The teenage motor vehicle fatality rate increased 2 percent from 2013 to 2014.**
  • Of the 451 children ages 8 and under who died in MVCs in 2014, 116 (26 percent) were not restrained by an age-appropriate device such as infant car seat, booster seat or seat belt. This age group was responsible for 15 percent of childhood MV fatalities.**

 

Safe Kids Worldwide has compiled research based upon numerous studies and research that have brings to light the statistics that we must aim to reduce.

See the full report.

 

*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Website. Leading causes of death, children ages 19 and under. Accessed February 23, 2016. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/leading_causes_death.html.

**National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NCSA Data Resource Website. Fatality Analysis Reporting System Encyclopedia. Accessed February 23, 2016.